Quick Answer: What Are The 20 Emergency Drugs?

What does Apinch stand for?

These medicines include anti-infective agents, anti-psychotics, potassium, insulin, narcotics and sedative agents, chemotherapy and heparin and other anticoagulants.

These medicines are represented by the acronym ‘A PINCH’.

The poster below can be used to assist hospitals in raising awareness of A PINCH medicines..

What is emergency injection?

In the case of an Addison crisis, or if one threatens, corticosteroids should be injected. This injection can be given into a muscle (intramuscular) by the GP or any medically trained person, or directly into the vein (intravenous).

Is atropine a poison?

Because of the hallucinogenic properties, some have used the drug recreationally, though this is potentially dangerous and often unpleasant. In overdoses, atropine is poisonous.

Why is atropine given?

Atropine is used to help reduce saliva, mucus, or other secretions in your airway during a surgery. Atropine is also used to treat spasms in the stomach, intestines, bladder, or other organs. Atropine is sometimes used as an antidote to treat certain types of poisoning.

How do you handle an emergency patient?

Steps to take when an emergency occurs:Take a deep breath.Count to 10. Tell yourself you can handle the situation.Check for danger. Protect yourself and the injured person from fire, explosions, or other hazards.Try to look at the situation as a whole.

What is adrenaline used for in an emergency?

This medication is used in emergencies to treat very serious allergic reactions to insect stings/bites, foods, drugs, or other substances. Epinephrine acts quickly to improve breathing, stimulate the heart, raise a dropping blood pressure, reverse hives, and reduce swelling of the face, lips, and throat.

How do you stop a heart attack immediately?

What to do if you or someone else may be having a heart attackCall 911 or your local medical emergency number. … Chew and swallow an aspirin, unless you are allergic to aspirin or have been told by your doctor never to take aspirin. … Take nitroglycerin, if prescribed. … Begin CPR if the person is unconscious.More items…•

What are the common emergency drugs?

Emergency drug dosesDrug (concentration) and IndicationDoseFentanyl (50 mcg/ml) Analgesia Sedation Anesthesia1 mcg/kgHydralazine (20 mg/ ml) Hypertension by vasodilation0.1-0.5 mg/kgLorazepam (2 mg/ml) Sedation Seizures0.05-01 mg/kgMorphine (1 mg/ml) Pain Sedation0.05-0.1 mg/kg11 more rows

How do you make a shot not hurt?

5 Tips for Surviving ShotsDistract yourself while you’re waiting. Bring along a game, book, music, or movie — something you’ll get completely caught up in so you’re not sitting in the waiting room thinking about the shot. … Concentrate on taking slow, deep breaths. … Focus intently on something in the room. … Cough. … Relax your arm.

What is the most common injection?

Most people are familiar with injections delivered into the muscle, intramuscular injections, but there are actually 3 other places that a needle be inserted to deliver medication. The most common site of intradermal injection is in the back or forearm. Vaccines are usually delivered via this route.

What are the emergency drugs in ICU?

Emergency drugs (PICU Chart)DrugDose (IV)Furosemide0.5–1 mg/Kg IVHydrocortisone2 mg/Kg IV bolusInsulin (regular)0.05–0.1 Units/Kg bolus IV or SQ 0.05–0.1 Units/Kg/hr infusionLidocaine 2%1 mg/Kg IV/IO*18 more rows

What drugs stimulate the heart?

In general, beta-blockers work by blocking the actions of certain chemicals that stimulate your heart, such as epinephrine (adrenaline). This allows the heart to beat more slowly and less forcefully. Your doctor may prescribe a beta-blocker to help prevent a first heart attack as well as repeat heart attacks.

What are the cardiac emergency drugs?

Understanding the drugs used during cardiac arrest responseAdrenaline. This is the first drug given in all causes of cardiac arrest and should be readily available in all clinical areas. … Amiodarone. … Lidocaine. … Atropine. … Additional drugs. … Calcium chloride. … Magnesium sulphate. … Miscellaneous drugs.More items…•

What is atropine used for in an emergency?

Typically, atropine is the drug of choice for symptomatic bradycardia. An anticholinergic and potent belladonna alkaloid, it increases the heart rate, which improves hemodynamic stability. Epinephrine may be used as a secondary measure if atropine and temporary heart pacing don’t improve hemodynamic stability.

What are the 3 types of injections?

The three main routes are intradermal (ID) injection, subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. Each type targets a different skin layer: Subcutaneous injections are administered in the fat layer, underneath the skin.

What are the high risk medications?

High risk medicationsA – Antimicrobials.P – Potassium and other electrolytes, psychotropic medications.I – Insulin.N – Narcotics, opioids and sedatives.C – Chemotherapeutic agents.H – Heparin and other anticoagulants.S – Safer systems (e.g. safe administration of liquid medications using oral syringes)Medicines and Technology Unit.

Can ECG detect heart blockage?

Your doctor may use an electrocardiogram to determine or detect: Abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmias) If blocked or narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) are causing chest pain or a heart attack. Whether you have had a previous heart attack.

What are critical drugs?

Whilst all medicines should be administered in a timely manner, there are some that must not be omitted or their administration delayed as this has the potential to cause harm. These are referred to as ‘critical medicines’.

What happens if you accidentally inject air into muscle?

Injecting a small air bubble into the skin or a muscle is usually harmless. But it might mean you aren’t getting the full dose of medicine, because the air takes up space in the syringe.

What happens if you give too much atropine?

Excess doses of atropine sulfate may cause side effects such as palpitations, dilated pupils, difficulty swallowing, hot dry skin, thirst, dizziness, restlessness, tremor, fatigue, and problems with coordination.

What is a life saving drug?

It is commonly known as SI 449 of 2015 or the emergency medicines legislation. These regulations allow trained non-medical persons to administer six prescription-only medicines to a person, without a prescription, for the purpose of saving their life or reducing severe distress in an emergency situation.